‘Girls will be successful’: Hangama, Hand in Hand trainer

For 15 years, in more than 10 countries, among millions of members, the story has been largely the same: learn from Hand in Hand’s training and start a micro-business as a tailor, shop owner, agri-business owner or more. Not so for Hangama. Instead of starting her own small business like other members, she decided she wanted to join our team as a trainer — helping other women like her.

“Being a trainer for Hand in Hand provided me the opportunity to serve other women in my village and this makes me happy,” she said.

The 23-year-old went from being a trainer to a livestock vocational trainer and is now a Head of Association in the Chemtal district of Balkh province in Afghanistan. Also known as producers’ groups, Associations are made up of Self-Help Groups who join together to buy in bulk, access value chains and more. Not only is Hangama our youngest Head of Association ever, she’s the first female Head of Association, too.

Balkh Province, Afghanistan

Ready for success

Only 19.4 percent of women in Afghanistan are employed, according to the International Labour Organization. The United Nations’ Human Development Report notes that just 8.8 percent of women aged 25 and up have a secondary school education, as women only attended school for an average of 1.6 years.

On a daily basis, Hangama is responsible for the success of nearly 900 people, with more than 100 of them being men. She chairs meetings with government officials twice her age. She negotiates with private companies to help beneficiaries tap into value chains. She manages administration duties. And more.

Gaining the people’s trust

Hangama takes a lot of pride in the work she has accomplished as a leader. “There is a lady almost 60 years old who runs a poultry farm. She is one of the most successful entrepreneurs of our community. She has earned so much from the business that she helps her son’s family [and grandchildren]. She has also expanded her business, and is encouraging other women to work.”

It isn’t all smiles, nor is it easy to accomplish all that she has. Hangama admitted it takes time to build trust with every woman and entrepreneur — getting community members to know what an association is and how it can help them, and to spread awareness. Other challenges include what might be deemed as the obvious: security and instability of the district in which she’s working in Afghanistan.

“There is a threat of security and women are afraid to step up and work,” Hangama said. “If women work, it is behind closed doors.”

The other major challenge, Hangama explained, is simply being a woman in her conservative community, dealing with the misbelief that women can’t and shouldn’t work.

With the difficulties, however, come the rewarding aspects of her job. She said the best part of her role is serving her community and other women. More than anything, she wants the women of Afghanistan to know that they are capable of starting a small business, as are the future generations of the country.

“I encourage women to educate their daughters, believe in their daughters and provide them necessary support,” she said. “Girls will be successful.”

Thanks to her role with Hand in Hand and her income, she has been able to help her husband, who works as a tinsmith, expand his business and she even decided to enrol in university hoping to become a businesswoman in the future.

Hangama’s results

Became Head of Association

Responsible for 900 members

Gained trust of the community